A Mouthful of Parabola

I spent 2 hours helping Nik with his math.  Usually I love math.  (Don’t hear that too often, do ya?!)  But when they are asking how to solve an equation to figure out the vertex of a parabola (or something along those lines)… I’m pretty much lost.  Give me fractions and your usual equations and I’m happy as can be.  Really, do people use these parabola thingies in day to day life?  When would you even need them?  I think I’ll call my dad – he’s PC230022 even more brilliant at math than I am.  Not that I’m feeling so smart now.  This is what happens when you study parabolas for too long!   I wouldn’t fret so much over it, but I know that I’ll need it again for Lexie.  We are homeschoolers.  Wouldn’t change it for anything.  We quit the brick-and-mortar schools about 4 years ago and it has been amazing.  I use the K12 online virtual academy program so that I don’t have to do all the lesson planning and they have excellent teachers to help.  So they get the school format with all the homeschooling benefits.  LOVE IT!!!  We went from having the teachers and school administration telling us that the kids were behind and needed special classes (which they give you the answers – you don’t learn anything!) to being advanced.  Go figure.  They just needed to start enjoying to learn again and to be able to take extra time on something if they weren’t getting it.  Schools and teachers are under so much pressure to hit benchmarks so that they can qualify for government funding that they can’t really “teach”.  All their pressures go right onto the kids.  I used to be afraid that my kids would be lacking because I kept them home.  Academically, they couldn’t be doing better.  Socially, well, they are some of the best behaved kids I know.  I’m not just saying that because I’m biased.  Since they are stuck with mom all the time, they don’t pick up all the behaviors that public school kids get.  Mom just won’t tolerate it.  They can hold intelligible conversations with adults just fine.  Lexie needs more interaction with kids her age.  Which we get through other homeschoolers and neighbors.  We are also joining 4H.  Nik could care less about other kids.  At first I was worried, but some kids just don’t need all the peer interaction.  He always was a bit shy.  He’s turning out just fine if I must say so!  They make mama so proud!!  And I love the flexibility of homeschooling.  Some days it is nice to take off and go do something.  No more worries of missing too many days without a doctor’s notice.  Nobody here gets sick much anymore.  Coincidence?  I think not.  No more dealing with bullies, peer pressure, expensive uniforms, class fees, strict schedules, and too much homework.  Of course, they are always here with me, so no break for mom.  But like I said, I love it.  And they seem pretty happy too.  Guess I’ll get back to learning those parabolas.  Reminds me of ebola – has the same side effects (ok – I’m exaggerating a bit)!

We went back to making our own toothpaste.  I stopped for a little while during our move because it was so easy to pick up a tube from the store.  I forgot how easy it is to make your own.  It’s definitely not for everyone.  Homemade toothpaste doesn’t foam up and some people think that bubbles equals clean.  Not true at all.  We learned to wet the toothbrush first and don’t add water once it’s on there!  I like how clean my mouth feels compared to store-bought toothpaste.  My gums are healthier and my teeth aren’t as032 sensitive.  The kids prefer it too.  Daddy hasn’t come around to the taste yet (he likes bubbles).  We started making our own toothpaste to avoid the chemicals in the commercial toothpaste.  Fluoride is controversial.  I prefer not to use it.  Studies have shown that too much fluoride results in the weakening of bones and pitting of teeth.  My kids don’t have cavities and it’s not from using fluoride.  Brush your teeth, floss, and limit sugar.  Too much fluoride is not good.  Maybe there’s a link between the increase in osteoporosis and fluoridated water.  Just something to think about. Triclosan, sodium lauryl sulfate, alcohol, cellulose gum (sawdust), artificial colors and flavors.  Yummy.  No wonder you have to call Poison Control if you swallow more than you need for brushing. 

Homemade Toothpaste

  • 1/2 cup baking soda
  • 2 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 Tbsp zylitol (optional)
  • 12 drops essential oil (peppermint, spearmint)
  • 2 Tbsp water

030

 

031

 

 

 

 

Mix up the first 4 ingredients and then slowly add the water.  Add the water to your desired consistency.  Place into a piping bag or small container.

Coconut oil is an antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral.  The zylitol is a sugar alcohol, so it won’t promote tooth decay, but helps to “sweeten” the toothpaste.  It also has a low glycemic impact which makes it safe for diabetics.  You can use any essential oil flavoring of your choice.  We prefer the “minty” ones.  I’m thinking of trying a little bit of clove oil next time.  Clove is highly antimicrobial, antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial.  And it has been used for ages.   I’ll be careful not to use too much004, clove oil is also “numbing”.  HHhhmmmm…. maybe not a bad idea if you want to keep somebody quiet.  Nah, I don’t want to have to deal with the drool.  Look at how well it cleans our Buster Bunny’s teeth!!  He is one spoiled bunny.

Okay.  I am off to figure out how much toothpaste it would take to fill a tub that increases exponentially at a constant rate.  If you don’t hear from me for a while, you’ll know I have completely lost my mind with this crazy parabola stuff.

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